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PIVOTING HR IN THE AGE OF THE GIG ECONOMY

It seems like every few months, there exists a new buzzword that signals a change or challenge that HR professionals are told to prepare for. Failing to do so, they are told, will lead to their swift demise. These ‘future of work’ prophecies no doubt bring with them a sense of fatigue.

The newest of such buzzwords is the ‘Gig Economy’. What is it? And what does it mean for HR?

A study from 2015 claimed that 44% of all US workers are involved in non-traditional employment – or ‘gigs’. The ‘gig economy’ (based around accommodation, transport and cars, e.g. Airbnb, Uber) was growing at 140% per year, based on the turnover of a sample of larger operators.

For some, it simply refers to the ever-growing number of people who use one of the (still relatively) new talent platforms or online service brokering like Uber, Airbnb, Grab, FoodPanda. For others, it includes these people, but also anyone who works in a continent, temporary, diversified, or freelance capacity. In other words, anyone who isn’t a full-time or part-time employee.

A study from 2015 claimed that 44% of all US workers are involved in non-traditional employment – or ‘gigs’. The ‘gig economy’ (based around accommodation, transport and cars, e.g. Airbnb, Uber) was growing at 140% per year, based on the turnover of a sample of larger operators.

Combined with factors such as increased workplace flexibility, a global, distributed workforce, advances in robotics and cognitive technologies of the ‘future workplace’ it becomes part of a range of factors HR needs to account for when planning future strategies.

71% of executives believe their companies are either ‘somewhat’ or ‘very’ able to manage contingent workers, with the main challenges being:

• Legal or regulatory uncertainty (20%)
• Culture is unreceptive (18%)
• Lack of understanding among leaders (18%).

Is your HR department ready for the gig economy?

Combined with factors such as increased workplace flexibility, a global, distributed workforce, advances in robotics and cognitive technologies of the ‘future workplace’ it becomes part of a range of factors HR needs to account for when planning future strategies.

Here are 4 changes you can implement to capitalise on this growing trend:

Embrace a flexible workplace

As the gig economy grows, one of the most significant ways it will affect the employment landscape is by bringing work-life balance to the forefront. Workplace flexibility is no longer a “nice-to-have” or a “perk.” Instead, it’s a make-or-break part of the job search for most applicants. Job searchers demand flexibility, and they know they can get it from the gig economy if full-time employers are unable to. As a result, employers are finding they have to offer flex time, work-from-home or telecommuting opportunities, and generous vacation packages if they want to woo top candidates. Parents with young families, in particular, aren’t budging on these requirements anymore. HR departments should take note of this demand and plan accordingly, whether that means adjusting benefits plans or completing network tweaks to make telecommuting more feasible.

As the gig economy grows, one of the most significant ways it will affect the employment landscape is by bringing work-life balance to the forefront.

Figure out which roles are ‘gigable’

Retaining your existing employees—and continuing to draw strong talent to full-time roles—is something that should remain a priority for your organisation as the gig economy grows. However, you should not ignore the statistics. The number of gig economy workers in the United States will hit 9.2 million by 2021—up from just 3.9 million in 2016. These numbers mean no business can ignore the gig economy, and companies that can embrace it will be in the best position to capture top talent and thrive.

These numbers mean no business can ignore the gig economy, and companies that can embrace it will be in the best position to capture top talent and thrive.

You may already have gig economy workers in your organisation, such as contractors, freelancers, or vendors. What you should continue to do is identify roles that could feasibly adapt to the gig economy. Which responsibilities or services could you bring into your business on a contract or freelance basis? You should focus on vacant or soon-to-be-vacant positions, but you can also look at jobs that are currently filled. That way, if someone leaves your organisation, you’ll know whether you can eliminate the position to save money or convert the job to freelance. Having some flexibility here will help you remain agile when ideal gig economy opportunities come along.

Focus on integration

Independent workers such as contractors or freelancers beat traditional employees in job engagement, innovation, satisfaction, and pride. Where they fall short of regular employees is in another area: commitment. Gig economy workers typically aren’t as committed to the companies they work for. Many freelancers work for multiple employers at once and rarely maintain communication with more than one or two people at each company. Figuring out ways to integrate your gig workers into your organisation more fully is a good strategy to prevent your company culture from eroding. Ideally, the extra integration will increase commitment, which in turn will make it easier for you to establish a pool of go-to freelancers that you can rely on again and again.

Establishing an onboarding strategy

You can’t afford to skip the onboarding step with gig workers, but many employers do it, anyway. They don’t run background checks, provide training, or do performance reviews. Instead, many gig workers work unvetted with limited supervision and almost no feedback until they turn in their assignments. This structure is unstable and puts undue risk on your business. Remember: your gig workers are still representatives of your brand. They enjoy access to company information and resources that are likely proprietary or confidential, and you still need to track and maintain their performance standards as they work.

You want to make sure every gig worker is someone you can trust. As for training, you should at the very least have a kickoff call or video conference briefing with the freelancer before getting them started. Even if the project is straightforward, you want to lay out your expectations firmly and clearly. Encourage the freelancer to contact you with any questions and ask for an early sample of their work to make sure they are on the right track before they complete an entire project.

Remember: your gig workers are still representatives of your brand.

These strategies will lay a foundation for a positive employer-freelancer relationship, which will make it easier for your business to embrace the benefits of the gig economy going forward. However, as with any big change, pivoting your HR department for the needs of this next generation of workers is easier said than done. To learn how we can help you streamline and perfect this process using data, and smart technology, visit us at Accendo.

Sources

https://time.com/4169532/sharing-economy-poll/
https://www2.deloitte.com/au/en/pages/human-capital/articles/human-capital-trends.html

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DEMYSTIFYING THE GIG ECONOMY

Today, we live in the age of the ‘gig economy’. It is an age where unpredictability is part of the everyday life of many workers. 40% of the US workforce now have nontraditional employer-employee jobs – and the number of these gigs is growing.

So why are people ‘gigging’?

Millennial workers largely use it as an income gap filler and like that it offers flexibility and control over their work schedule. And in exchange for demanding this free time, flexibility and more control over their work, they have had to forgo medical coverage, retirement benefits and many other securities that contribute to a social safety net that was spurred by the Great Depression.

It is an age where unpredictability is part of the everyday life of many workers. 40% of the US workforce now have nontraditional employer-employee jobs – and the number of these gigs is growing.

So is it a win-win for workers? What are the real pros and cons of the gig economy anyway?

Advantages

• Flexibility: Unlike traditional employees, gig workers are free to choose what types of jobs they do and when and where they do them. The ability to work from home helps in balancing work and family schedules and demands.
• Independence: For people who like to be left alone while they complete an assignment, gig work is ideal. Not hindered by traditional office interruptions like staff meetings, progress reviews, and water cooler gossip sessions, gig economy workers are typically given almost unlimited independence to do their work when and how they think it should be done.
• Variety: The old office problem of monotony is rare in gig work. A wide variety of tasks and clients every day keeps the work interesting, helping gig workers be more enthusiastic and creative in their work. You can be the master of how dull or interesting you want your day to be.

Gig economy workers are typically given almost unlimited independence to do their work when and how they think it should be done.

Disadvantages

• Modest Pay: Without the protection of minimum wages, unions, or salary scales, gig workers are often forced to reduce their fees in order to secure a job – at least to a level that makes them a more attractive proposition than their competitors for the same job.
• No Benefits: Very few gig jobs come with any sort of health or retirement benefits. While some long-term contracts may come with limited benefit packages, even this is rare.
• Taxes and Expenses: Since contract gig workers are not legally classified as “employees,” their employers do not withhold income tax or EPF contributions from their pay. As a result, gig workers must make estimated tax payments and set aside their own savings safety net. In addition, most gig workers are responsible for buying their own work-related equipment like cars, computers, and smartphones. While some of these expenses can be deducted from taxes, not all can be.
• Stress: All of the above, along with the need to constantly be looking for their next gig and dealing with changes in their current contract can make for increased stress—an undesirable tradeoff to the greater flexibility of gig work.

For employers, however, the gig economy is mostly a win-win proposition. Businesses are able to quickly contract with experts for individual projects without the overhead costs like office space, training, and benefits.

From the manager’s viewpoint, the key advantage of the ‘gig economy’ is flexibility. As a result of the flexibility created, he or she can switch labour on and off, almost at will.

As a result of the flexibility created, he or she can switch labour on and off, almost at will.

There are two downsides. First, most managers are, understandably, disinclined to develop the skills of a freelance gig worker. They must come ready with skills and knowledge. If the manager’s firm needs increased skill and knowledge, the manager must cancel the freelancer’s contract and find someone of greater competence. Few freelancers bother to develop themselves – that, after all, would mean downtime and zero billing for the duration of the training activity. At any rate, most freelancers are in it for the money. The relationship is purely economic, and there is little loyalty due to the temporary nature of each gig.

Second, don’t expect commitment from a freelancer. Just as the manager can switch labour on and off, the freelancer can leave at will – or at least giving notice within the terms of the contract. The relationship is in balance and this does build respect. The relationship is, however, precarious. If something untoward happens or if the freelancer gets a better gig, they’ll be off.

Don’t expect commitment from a freelancer. Just as the manager can switch labour on and off, the freelancer can leave at will.

Is the gig economy really a game-changer?

It can work well for people seeking a little extra cash. But it has major drawbacks for those who want solid, predictable income and some protection from the ups and downs of the economy or for employers who need a reliable, collaborative workforce. As the gig economy matures, it is becoming clear that every trend has its limits.

Nonetheless, with the rise of startups like Grab and Uber who depend on an increasing supply of freelance gig workers, there is an ever-increasing need to understand the nature of the gig economy and the workers that support it, and to learn how to tailor your HR department and organisation as a whole in order to realise its full potential. To learn how we can help you do that using smart data analytics and technology, visit us at Accendo.

Sources

https://www.gao.gov/assets/670/669899.pdf

THE LEADERSHIP DEVELOPMENT TRAP: HOW TO BUILD AND NOT WASTE YOUR LEADERS

Good leaders are the key to any successful organisation, and developing them is the best way to invest in continued prosperity and growth.

However, leadership development is one key metric of success that even the most successful organisations are failing at. According to research from the Corporate Executive Board (CEB), 66% of companies invest in programs that aim to identify high-potential employees and help them advance, but only 24% of senior executives at those firms consider the programs to be a success. What is telling is that the world’s largest corporations, 30% of new CEOs are hired from outside the company.

What is telling is that the world’s largest corporations, 30% of new CEOs are hired from outside the company.

It is not as if organisations are not investing in leadership development. For years, organisations have lavished time and money on improving the capabilities of managers and on nurturing new leaders. US companies alone spend almost $14 billion annually on leadership development.

But these initiatives are missing the mark, at great cost. With 30 percent of US companies admitting that they have failed to exploit their international business opportunities fully because they lack enough leaders with the right capabilities.

So just why are these leadership development mistakes occurring? And how do you overcome them?

With 30 percent of US companies admitting that they have failed to exploit their international business opportunities fully because they lack enough leaders with the right capabilities.

Overlooking context

Context is a critical component of successful leadership. A brilliant leader in one situation does not necessarily perform well in another. Imagine the CEO of a large services business who has an outstanding record when markets were growing quickly, but then fails to provide clear direction or to impose financial discipline on the group’s business units during an economic downturn – choosing instead, to continue encouraging innovation and new thinking—hallmarks of the culture that had previously brought success—until he is finally replaced for underperformance.

Context is a critical component of successful leadership.

Too many training initiatives rest on the assumption that one size fits all and that the same group of skills or style of leadership is appropriate regardless of strategy, organisational culture, or CEO mandate. Focusing on context inevitably means equipping leaders with a small number of competencies (two to three) that will make a significant difference to performance. When a company cuts through the noise to identify a small number of leadership capabilities essential for success in its business—such as high-quality decision making or stronger coaching skills—it achieves far better outcomes.

Too many training initiatives rest on the assumption that one size fits all regardless of strategy, organisational culture, or CEO mandate.

Decoupling reflection from real work

Which works better, leadership classes in a university classroom setting, or actually doing a job?

When it comes to planning a leadership development program, organisations face a delicate balancing act. On the one hand, there is value in off-site programs that offer participants time to step back and escape the pressing demands of a day job. On the other hand, even after very basic training sessions, adults typically retain just 10 percent of what they hear in classroom lectures, versus nearly two-thirds when they learn by doing. Furthermore, burgeoning leaders, no matter how talented, often struggle to transfer even their most powerful off-site experiences into changed behaviour on the front line.

So wouldn’t it be better to ditch the classroom programs and concentrate on practical on-the-job training? It isn’t as straightforward as it sounds. It isn’t easy to create opportunities that simultaneously address high-priority needs like accelerating a new-product launch, turning around a sales region, negotiating an external partnership, or developing a new digital-marketing strategy—and provide personal-development opportunities for the participants.

Underestimating mindsets

To be a more effective leader, one has to change one’s way of thinking and the behaviour that goes along with it. While most companies recognise that this also means adjusting underlying mind-sets, too often these organisations are reluctant to address the root causes of why leaders act the way they do. Doing so will be uncomfortable for all involved, but it is an essential step to changing behaviour. Identifying some of the deepest, “below the surface” thoughts, feelings, assumptions, and beliefs is usually a precondition of behavioural change—one too often left out of development programs.

So, how can organisations create more-effective development programs and cut down on an immense amount of potential in-grown talent?

To be a more effective leader, one has to change one’s way of thinking and the behaviour that goes along with it.

Determining the most important competencies for leadership roles.

There are 8 that are crucial for senior executive performance. They are results orientation, strategic orientation, collaboration and influence, team leadership, developing organisational capabilities, change leadership, market understanding, and inclusiveness.

Rigorously assessing the potential of aspiring managers.

This involves checking their motivational fit and carefully rating them on the four key hallmarks— curiosity, insight, engagement, and determination.

Creating a growth map

This shows how a person’s strengths in each of the hallmarks align with the competencies required in various roles.

Giving those with high potential the right development opportunities

Including job rotations and promotions they might not seem completely qualified for but that fit their growth maps—as well as targeted coaching and support.

It is undeniable that leadership development is essential in an organisation’s future success. It is also undeniable that current initiatives often fall short, costing precious talent to evaporate, resources to be wasted, and turnover to increase. It remains critical for employers and employees to both take ownership and initiate their own learning and development, despite the challenges. And this is where we can help. To learn how we can help you facilitate and enable your employees to be in command of their leadership development and grow for your organisation’s future, get in touch by visiting Accendo.

Sources
https://hbr.org/2017/11/turning-potential-into-success-the-missing-link-in-leadership-development
Laci Loew and Karen O’Leonard, Leadership Development Factbook 2012: Benchmarks and Trends in U.S. Leadership Development

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HOW TO HARNESS NEXT GEN TALENT TODAY

The 21st century is a brave new world indeed. Who could have predicted the skills needed to thrive in today’s economy – an economy of startups, cloud-based computing, wearable tech and social media entrepreneurs?

The familiarity with rapidly transforming technology and tools; the rise of hardcore quantitative skills in banking, advertising, and healthcare; the rapidly blurring lines between hard and soft skills. These developments were unpredictable.

The next generation needs ‘Talent Heroes’ – leaders who understand the looming skills crisis and are doing something about it.

Many are calling this the 4th Industrial Revolution. And it is a revolution that is charging full speed ahead. For the most part, today’s skills will continue to be crucial. however, the next generation of job skills has the potential to be even more of a wildcard, and leaders of today’s top organisations should take notice and look to better understand how to find, hire, and cultivate the right talent. The next generation needs ‘Talent Heroes’ – leaders who understand the looming skills crisis and are doing something about it.

The next generation of job skills has the potential to be even more of a wildcard, and leaders of today’s top organisations should take notice and look to better understand how to find, hire, and cultivate the right talent.

Rise of the Talent Hero

This 4th Industrial Revolution reduces the barriers between physical and digital systems, where everything from artificial intelligence, 5G, 3D printing, and the Internet of Things will play a role in transforming industries across the board. Workforces will go from managing specific verticals to working in an interlocking system driven by automation and algorithms. Without a doubt, the transformative impacts will great.

With executives saying that employees’ lack of technological fluency is a challenge in preparing workforces for the short-term ways in which work is changing.

According to a recent survey, more than half of C-suite executives think there’s too great a mismatch between current skill sets and those necessary in the future. They also think they lack the knowledge of what skills will be needed in the future. Much of that skill gap-related anxiety is focused on the role of emerging technologies in the coming years: With executives saying that employees’ lack of technological fluency is a challenge in preparing workforces for the short-term ways in which work is changing.

Many executives, however, don’t believe the onus falls on business to help develop employees’ necessary skills. Instead, 80 percent of business leaders think it’s up to the government, the education system, and individuals to develop the skills workers will need to succeed in the future.

To that point, Accendo’s TalentPulse – the first intelligent talent experience platform – is a boon for both employers and employees as it enables personalised career-pathing and skills development journeys that, at its core, puts the onus and prerogative of career development in the hands of the employees. This allows for an extremely customised career journey within an organisation and the business now acts purely as a facilitator; no longer the driver for development.

Instead, 80 percent of business leaders think it’s up to the government, the education system, and individuals to develop the skills workers will need to succeed in the future.

This will augment and aid the ‘Talent Heroes’ – a subgroup of executives who take a more proactive route in preparing their workforces and who feel more responsible for training their employees in emerging skill sets than their peers do. These people are highly tech-savvy: Talent Heroes are more likely to invest in disruptive technology and are committed to using those technologies in an ethical manner.

Harnessing tomorrow’s workforce

Building the best workforce of tomorrow means that business leaders will need to be more strategic when it comes to building a path towards the future of work. Make it a priority to ensure your workforce keeps up with emerging technologies and techniques, particularly those that will be deployed within your business or industry. Understand the priorities and expectations of this generation as well as the next one. Think about what skills your workforce will need to have not just tomorrow, but in the years and decades to come. It can mean the difference between a company that thrives in the workplace of the future, and one that dies.

Bridging the skills gap

Many organisations are taking steps to address the skills gap and maintain a high-quality workforce, but are they taking the right steps? Not every remedy to the skills shortage is effective, and even those that are highly effective for some positions aren’t right for all difficult-to-fill positions. So how can you attempt to best bridge the skills gap while your talent is developing?

• Providing onsite training to employees (e.g., seminars, training programs)
• Starting/expanding training programs to help improve the skills of new hires
• Hiring external workforce (e.g., temps, independent contractors)
• Increasing compensation
• Improving retention efforts for current employees

What is clear is that there exists a clear and present need to address the skills gap in the workforce, but the good thing is there are fundamentally sound ways in which to start to do it. It isn’t an easy process but with the right help, your organisation can be on the way to thriving in this 4th Industrial Revolution. Find out how we can help you do this through a combination of data-driven, behavioural science-based, and intelligent solutions by reaching out to Accendo.

BRIDGING THE ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE SKILLS GAP

WINNING IN THE 21ST CENTURY: BRIDGING THE ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE SKILLS GAP

There is no doubt that A.I is changing the way we work.

According to some reports, four in five business leaders in Asia Pacific believe the burgeoning technology will transform the way their firms operate within the next three years. But still, there exists a glaring disconnect among the workforce as a whole.

As many as 15 percent of employees believe AI will have no impact on their jobs. Meanwhile, more than three-quarters (77 percent) expect their employer to help them develop skills to adapt to the changing environment.

There is a critical need for employees and employers to work together in order to attain the skills to survive let alone thrive in the A.I augmented future to come.

As many as 15 percent of employees believe AI will have no impact on their jobs. Meanwhile, more than three-quarters (77 percent) expect their employer to help them develop skills to adapt to the changing environment.

There is no doubt that intelligent technologies will change the tasks that make up work and as such new skills that will be required to perform them. Education and corporate training will need to commit to 3 main areas to develop these skills.

Speeding up Experiential Learning.

Thanks to advances in neuroscience and technology, the development of experiential learning techniques have progressed significantly in recent years. These techniques are about learning through hands-on application, rather than absorbing knowledge by listening or reading. Also of great benefit are simulation training tools for more technical functions, on-the-job training initiatives, learning plans, and the use of new technologies such as Virtual Reality (VR) or Artificial Intelligence (AI) to make learning more immersive, engaging and personalised.

Shifting the focus from institutions to individuals.

Possessing a broad variety of skills is of great value across the workforce. But there needs to be a greater emphasis on broadening the variety of skills within each worker. Education and training objectives should encourage each individual to develop a broader mix of skills, rather than producing only a certain number of graduates from specific courses. This mix should include a focus on complex reasoning, creativity and social-emotional intelligence.

Empowering vulnerable learners.

Education and corporate lifelong learning systems must be accessible to all in order to truly close the skills gap. Workers who are vulnerable to disruption from technological change must be identified for targeted interventions.

It is also important for employers and HR professionals to understand what a good future-ready employee is and how to recognise him or her among the workforce. To that end, it pays to augment HR departments with intelligent talent platforms that help evaluate and keep track of employee skills needs and progress.

Such platforms can help measure job role fit and potential flight risk, as well as provide managers with ideal development paths for their existing talent pool. They can also help HR departments connect with skills assessments from the best providers in the market to aid in recruitment all the way to talent development.

It is also important for employers and HR professionals to understand what a good future-ready employee is and how to recognise him or her among the workforce.

Smart platforms also help reveal the hidden talent in an organisation, thereby negating the need to hire externally. This is handy, especially when it compares internal and external talent from third-party, professionally trusted sources liked LinkedIn. More importantly, employing such a platform helps future-proof organisations, by accurately measuring the skills of employees in order to identify their talent credentials. This helps build an agile workforce, based on skills needed rather than tenure, as well as helping make sure that a company’s workforce has the up-to-date skills in order to adapt to the reconfiguration of positions, as tasks evolve and worker capabilities are augmented by machines.

So is your company and your workforce ready for the challenges and the opportunities that the future brings? What is clear is that whether work is automated or augmented, the need for urgent skill-building and new approaches to learning is desperately needed. And some groups of workers and sectors in particular, could be in need of pressing and targeted interventions.

That is where we come in. Find out how we can help your organisation bridge the A.I skills gap and accelerate the way you adapt and thrive in the 21st century through intelligent platforms, data, and our expertise by getting in touch via Accendo.

Sources

https://www.cnbc.com/2019/02/20/microsoft-idc-study-skills-shortages-stopping-companies-from-using-ai.html

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HOW TO MAKE POTENTIAL WORK FOR YOU

We all know that senior colleague who earned their position by virtue of being around a long time, and not because they are particularly great at the job in question.

The ones who hedge their survival on buying the boss a Teh Tarik or two every week.

If this sounds tired and outdated, it’s because it is.

For thousands of years, we made choices about one another on the basis of physical attributes. If you wanted to construct a temple, fight a war, or harvest a crop, you chose the fittest, healthiest, strongest people you could find. Those attributes were easy to assess, and, despite their growing irrelevance, we still unconsciously look for them: Fortune 500 CEOs are on average 2.5 inches taller than the average American, and the statistics on military leaders and country presidents are similar.

This morphed in the 20th century when IQ—verbal, analytical, mathematical, and logical cleverness—was justifiably seen as an important factor in hiring processes, especially for white-collar roles, with standardised tests and educational results used as measures. The trend then shifted towards competency testing in which candidates were evaluated on specific characteristics and skills that helped predict outstanding performance in the roles for which they were being hired. Research also showed that emotional intelligence was even more important than IQ when it came to leadership roles. This is still largely practised today, and as a direct result, advancement can all too often be procured by virtue of simply mastering the art of tea drinking, brown-nosing.

Today, the focus must shift on succession planning by gauging potential.

But now, we enter a new era. Today, the focus must shift on succession planning by gauging potential. Competitive environments shift, a company’s strategy might change, fortunes ebb, jobs might require leaders to collaborate with or manage a different group of colleagues. So the question is not whether your company’s employees and leaders have the right skills; it’s whether they have the potential to learn new ones.

What qualities can we identify to measure the potential of employees we are grooming for succession?

Curiosity: a penchant for seeking out new experiences, knowledge, and candid feedback and an openness to learning and change

Insight: the ability to gather and make sense of information that suggests new possibilities

Engagement: a knack for using emotion and logic to communicate a persuasive vision and connect with people

Determination: the wherewithal to fight for difficult goals despite challenges and to bounce back from adversity

This is all well and good. But most companies need to first kick-start their succession planning initiatives. And this can seem daunting at first. Just where do you start? And how do you begin to make potential work for you? Here are 7 first steps.

Be proactive
It can take time to find and prepare a promising candidate for a leadership role. Even if you don’t think you’ll need a replacement in the near future, prepping someone to assume an important role creates an invaluable safety net

Look for people who best display the skills necessary to thrive in higher positions, regardless of their current title.

Keep an open mind
The obvious successor may not always be the one who is second in command, don’t disregard other promising employees. Look for people who best display the skills necessary to thrive in higher positions, regardless of their current title.

Make the vision known
Include potential managers in strategy conversations to help them acquire planning and leadership skills, as well as a broad vision of the organisation and its objectives.

Offer regular feedback to protégés
When someone uses well-honed presentation skills or outperforms on a project, make note of it. Keep track of these achievements in a top-performer file so you have something to reference the next time a management position opens.

Provide training to peak performers
As you identify your top performers, offer mentoring relationships, job shadowing and training, which add true value and help them develop new skills and refine existing ones.

Do a trial run of your succession plan
A vacation is a great time to have a potential successor step in to assume some responsibilities. The employee will gain experience while you learn how prepared the person is to take on a bigger role.

Succession planning process can help you identify where to focus your recruiting efforts

Use your plan to develop a hiring strategy
Once you’ve identified internal employees as successors for key roles in your organisation, take note of any talent gaps. In this way, the succession planning process can help you identify where to focus your recruiting efforts.

Identifying the potential of your future leaders can be further aided with a data-centred approach, free from personal bias, and is a great first step to charting your company’s succession planning roadmap. To learn how we can help, visit Accendo.

Sources
https://hbr.org/2014/06/21st-century-talent-spotting

Group 3237

OPERATION: MISSION (I’M)POSSIBLE

How do you get your staff to be creatively involved, work long hours and be willing to go above and beyond their job descriptions?

It’s simple. You give them a mission and vision to believe in.

Get it right and your employees no longer work for you, they work with you. They will be devoted to the success of the company, and work becomes more than a job – it becomes a calling. In effect, this can make all the difference.
The truth is, for a vast majority of people, work is merely a means to an end. They spend a majority of their waking hours on the job, desperately trying to find the time for what they love – hobbies, family, holidays.

Get it right and your employees no longer work for you, they work with you.

It doesn’t have to be this way. People often feel enriched when they believe they are working towards something meaningful or if they have a sense of accomplishment. And although this is good for employees, finding meaning and a sense of purpose is also essential for your company. The right mission gives your company meaning and helps you stand out against the competition and differentiates you in the eyes of consumers.

It also helps create a sense of ownership for employees, which will give them the incentive to do a good job, not because it is asked of them, but it is something they feel compelled to do.

The best mission statements should be about more than striving for commercial success or shareholder value. Instead, it should give employees a sense of how their efforts can contribute and enrich the lives of their customers, or the communities around them.

Creating a mission statement is only half the battle. After crafting a powerful mission, top management has to strive to live up to it. That means walking the talk, day in – day out. In the best companies, employees are engaged because their bosses live by example. When this happens, performance goals are met and mutual respect creates a working environment that is inherently meaningful.

Now while many companies have a mission statement – for better or worse – is this sufficient to attract the best talent?

While a clearly defined mission statement works wonders to identify a company’s purpose, it is a vision statement that employees really connect with. It lays out the direction in which the company is going and how they’re going to get there. In short, a company’s vision statement should inspire and motivate employees and get them to find meaning in what they do each day.

So how can you begin to define a vision statement that attracts the best talent?

Direction. Direction. Direction.
Where do you see the company in five years? How will you get there? What problems do you hope to solve and what do you hope to achieve? A great vision is always looking to the future.

Specificity.
Create actionable items that employees can easily remember and align themselves with. Use concise language that is forward-looking and memorable without being overly long.

Alignment.
The vision statement should align with the companies values but also the goals of its employees. This means your vision statement needs to be crafted to be relevant to your desired workforce and broad enough to use for a variety of employees.

Communication.
In order to be of use, your vision needs to be communicated and understood by your employees both current and future. This can be as simple as keeping everyone up to date with changes, via email or simply but clearly communicated via the company’s website or social media pages.

So now that you know what it takes to create an effective vision statement, what comes next?

At Accendo, we believe that people are the strength, heart and soul of any company. We’ve got the tools to connect you to the talent who are not only the best but who also connect with your company’s mission and vision. With our expertise, you and your employees can begin to work together and create a future of collaboration, effectiveness, meaning and success.

Sources

https://www.entrepreneur.com/article/245249

HOW DO WE PREPARE OUR HR DEPARTMENTS FOR THE FUTURE AND BEYOND?

HOW DO WE PREPARE OUR HR DEPARTMENTS FOR THE FUTURE AND BEYOND?

21st-century human resources is boldly going where no one has gone before.

At the beginning of every episode of Star Trek, Captain James T. Kirk or Captain Jean-Luc Picard
would proclaim a mission statement.

Space, the final frontier. These are the voyages of the starship Enterprise. Its continuing mission,
to explore strange new worlds. To seek out new life and new civilisations. To boldly go where no
one has gone before!

This, in essence, is what Human Resources is in the 21st-century. An HR professional is in effect, a
Starfleet Captain, boldly steering the ship past new threats and challenges, on a mission to
improve job satisfaction and company success, while breaking new ground and adapting to the
ever-changing needs of corporations. They might even encounter an alien being or two in their
adventures.

This is because a 21st-century company has to be employee-centric in order to stay relevant and
push the boundaries of the industry. After all, it’s great people that make a great company.
Talent is now a white-hot commodity in the universal marketplace and individuals have more power to
knowingly influence the culture of a company than ever before. This has resulted in a much need
transformation of corporate human resources teams who are now forced to navigate new technologies,
manage employee expectations and ensure that the organisation has a productive and happy workforce
– and doing so without a skin-tight, brightly coloured leotard.

The human resources department of the 21st-century will favour specialisation over a generalised,
one-size-fits-all approach to workforce management.

The human resources department of the 21st-century will favour specialisation over a generalised,
one-size-fits-all approach to workforce management. The responsibilities that fall onto the plate
of a Chief Human Resources Officer and his or her small “jack-of-all-trades” team will now be
spread out across a functionally diverse stack of specialists.

So what roles will fill the Starship that is 21st-century HR department?

Manager of Employee Engagement
Organisations are realising that a two-way conversation between leadership and teams is far more
engaging than a one-way dialogue, and are beginning to move away from the dry print-out
review process that dictated how we measure and assess employee performance, happiness, and
engagement. Because of modern employee engagement software,
teams can have more ongoing
and dynamic discussions about their job performance and no longer have to rely on rigid 6 or 12
month review cycles.

Director of Learning
Dynamic companies constantly level up the workforce through training and skills development.
Technology will change, processes will change; and more importantly, customers will change.

A Director of Learning will be a crucial role in the ongoing education of the workforce. This role
will require someone who understands the adult learning process, and will be key for designing
voluntary or mandatory training programs. Directors of learning will be responsible for bridging
virtual and in-person training sessions and exercises; produce content that will be consumed by
program participants; champion the program across the organisation, and ensure that tangible
behavioural changes take place across the company.

Diversity Officer
Studies prove that a diverse workforce results in a prosperous company. Diversity Officers will be
responsible for ensuring that the workforce is made up of talented individuals from many walks of
life. The Diversity Officer will work closely work with the Director of Learning and Employee
Engagement Manager to craft inclusion training programs that will foster understanding between
many different types of people and teams.

Mindset Coach
An overworked workforce is an unhappy workforce. A proper wellness program will include work-
life balance processes, stress management and therapy programs, and facilitating an open
dialogue around mental health and illness to remove much of the stigma that plagues the
conversation and ailments.

Talent and Repertoire Manager
Sports franchises and the entertainment industry have long benefitted from internal scouts with an
eye for great people. Companies should enjoy the same. A Talent and Repertoire Manager can be
the eyes and ears on the ground for specific industries, with a great relationship with top
recruitment firms, and incubators, ecosystems or industry communities. They will also navigate
transformative trends in the talent marketplace–salary expectations, hot skillsets, and prospect
track records–that will be crucial to the competitive offers an organisation may submit to potential
prospects.

With a fully stocked team of professionals to work with, 21st-century HR managers will indeed feel
like they are on the bridge of their starship, bravely pushing forward to overcome the challenges
and reap the rewards that lay ahead in time and space.

To learn how to get your HR departments ready for the future, visit us at Accendo.

Sources
https://www.forbes.com/sites/kaviguppta/2016/01/05/power-to-the-people-four-ways-corporate-culture-became-people-centric-in-2015/#5d500eeb50bc

https://www.softwareadvice.com/resources/the-hr-department-of-2020/

https://www.shiftelearning.com/blog/statistics-on-corporate-training-and-what-they-mean-for-your-companys-future

https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/03/140319085430.htm

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Accendo Aims to Help with Deep People Analytics and Career Pathing, During EXPAND Philippines

Manila, Philippines – For the second year in a row, Launchgarage, the Philippines’ premiere tech accelerator, partnered with the Malaysian Digital Economy Corporation (MDEC) to host its second cohort for EXPAND Philippines, a structured 3-week market access program for Malaysian startups seeking to test and validate their products and services in the Philippines. 

“The cross border collaboration between Launchgarage Philippines and Malaysia Digital Economy Corporation (MDEC) has created market access opportunities for Malaysian startups to expand their network and services to the Philippines. This program would not have been possible without our partner, Launchgarage. MDEC is extremely honoured to have been part of these startups expansion into the Philippines” said Keasavan Hari Krishnan, MDEC Market Engagement Lead for Growth Ecosystem Development. 

In collaboration with UnionBank, the consortium hosted their second Demo Day which featured six Malaysian companies and their products and services last August 31 at Unionbank Plaza in Pasig City. 

“We want to identify startups that we can help be successful not just here in the Philippines, but globally,” said Jojo Flores, COO of Launchgarage. 

The event was graced by the presence of Alaminos City (Pangasinan) Mayor Arth Bryan Celeste, who at 22 years is the Philippines youngest mayor. During his speech, Celeste talked about the significance of startups and the importance of partnerships. The Mayor of the northern Philippine city also cited his eagerness to integrate various projects from the crop of companies into their ecosystem and avail of services that would benefit his constituents. 

“Startups have the power to change the world. The people behind these startups have that power but I believe that not one man can change the world, we need partners” said Celeste.

The 2019 cohort features a diverse set of elite-tier companies which include: CK Group, an Integrated Property Marketing Agency specializing in digital design solutions using the latest media and visualization technology, Sometime by Asian Designers, an e-commerce bag and accessories specialist company that co-designs with very select established Asian designers and icons to conceptualize and produce exclusive and iconic designer bags,NEXPlatform, a data-driven Proptech company that provides smart marketing solutions to help property developers digitalise their processes and improve customer experience, Accendo developed TalentPulse, a Talent Experience platform designed to help with deep people analytics and career pathing and SonicBoom, an all-in-one open payment terminal for parking, vending machines, and retail stores. 

The official media partner for the event was Ambidextr, a content marketing and events management company focused on telling the stories of tech companies in Asia Pacific.  

“We’re excited that more startups are looking to expand to the Philippines as a major part of their growth plans. With a large, young and digital-savvy population, the country is the second-fastest growing economy in ASEAN. Startups have a very unique opportunity to play a part in the country’s leap towards industrialization, thanks to initiatives such as EXPAND Philippines, said Ambidextr Managing Partner Junie Agcaoili.

ABOUT MALAYSIA DIGITAL ECONOMY CORPORATION (MDEC)

Malaysia Digital Economy Corporation or MDEC is the lead agency in driving the digital economy in Malaysia under the Ministry of Communications and Multimedia Malaysia. Since its inception 23 years ago, MDEC’s mission is to develop the nation’s digital economy. MDEC’s implementation efforts are centred on driving investments, building local tech champions, catalysing digital innovation ecosystems and propagating digital inclusivity.

ABOUT LAUNCHGARAGE INNOVATION HUB

Launchgarage is the premiere technology accelerator for traction stage startups in the Philippines comprised of a large and diverse global network of industry experts, stakeholders, investors, and collaborators that aims to bring local companies to the global market through deal-flow facilitation, advisory and various programs. It was founded in 2016 by Jay Fajardo and Jojo Flores, two of the country’s most revered and well-known icons in the tech industry.

ABOUT UNIONBANK OF THE PHILIPPINES

Union Bank of the Philippines (UnionBank) is a publicly listed universal bank.

They distinguish themselves through superior technology, unique branch sales & service culture, and centralized backroom operations. Their superior technology allows the delivery of online, real-time business solutions to meet their customers’ changing and diverse needs through innovative and customized cash management products and service offerings. 

ABOUT ACCENDO

Accendo developed TalentPulse, a Talent Experience platform that is designed to help with deep people analytics and career pathing. As organizations are grappling with the “future of work”, Accendo is providing some of the biggest companies in SEA a solution to identify people that can cope with this digital era of change and lead their organizations forward.

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Smile When Your Best People Leave You

It goes against the grain to be happy when your best people leave you. It is rarer still to help them do it. The fact remains is that everybody leaves, and how you deal with it will separate you from others, and helps you stand apart.

As a recruiter, it should give you pride when the people you have hired, leave to assume better positions or roles of leadership somewhere else. You should have a strong belief in employee growth and fulfilment, even to the point of them leaving the company in order to spread their wings. Think of it as a strong statement of your company’s culture.

This outlook can conversely help in the hiring process. When hiring, make it clear to candidates that the company will do all it can to make sure they are constantly growing at a personal level, especially in areas like leadership, skills, competency and fulfilment – apart from merely a way to make a living.

Remember that when employees leave, they become ambassadors for your brand. All that they have learned, they take with them. They become examples of your company’s culture, and take a piece of you with them to their next role, giving your company a chance to directly influence another. They become your informal spokespeople, and their favourable words can be your most valued referral system.

As positive as this outlook may be, for some, it might not ease the hurt of dealing with someone leaving.

The first thing to remember is, it isn’t personal. Remember that the terms of their employment didn’t include being committed to your company’s culture for life. If they are a valued asset, it is a good chance that they have put in years of committed service, and are entitled to enjoy the fruits of their labour with bigger roles and more perks elsewhere, if you are unable to provide it. Also, remember that the best employees don’t just work hard on your business, they work hard on themselves.

They are constantly working to better themselves and their positions in life. This means that you may not always be in a position to provide that next rung up the ladder when they feel they need to move up in the world, and in their careers. They’ve worked hard and were great additions to your team. Maybe they will again someday.

So, while good employees leaving is inevitable, not all employee departures are unavoidable.

So, while good employees leaving is inevitable, not all employee departures are unavoidable. Remember that it is your job to make your people love their jobs. A fact that many people forget, in their quests to increase revenue or succeed in a business.

That doesn’t mean a pool table, big screen TVs and free catered lunches, but talking, asking and listening to what your employees have to say, then acting on it.

Take time to talk to your employees about their lives. Make it a point of emphasis to set and discuss professional goals and challenges they hope to overcome. Ask them what they want to accomplish in a certain timeframe. Listen to what they have to say, then act to help them achieve that. That could mean them leaving for something better, but if that is so, you’ll be able to count it as a win for your part in helping them achieve that.

If you are to be happy when your best employees leave, how do you even begin to replace them?

Remember that nobody should be indispensable. That might seem like a counter-intuitive mindset but no single employee should be un-replaceable should they leave. No task or role in your company should one that only a single employee knows how to do. Make sure to take redundancies into account when you plan out your hiring. And what about hiring? If you are to be happy when your best employees leave, how do you even begin to replace them?

Here at Accendo, we have more than 20 years of industry knowledge to help you do make sure you get the right, most talented and skilled hires. We believe in People, Performance and Work and have the technology and tools to not only attract the right kind of candidates but train, inspire and retain them too, helping your company attract a performance-oriented workforce who seek to better both themselves and your company, helping to drive you forward towards greater successes.